Subcategories

Alpine Skiing

AlpineAlpine skiing, or downhill skiing, is the sport or recreation of sliding down snow-covered hills on skis with fixed-heel bindings. It is characterized by the requirement for mechanical assistance getting to the top of the hill, since the equipment does not allow efficient walking or hiking, unlike cross-country skis which use free-heel bindings. It is typically practiced at ski resorts which provide services such as ski lifts, artificial snowmaking and grooming,first aid, and restaurants. Back-country skiers use alpine skiing equipment to ski off the marked pistes, in some cases with the assistance of snowmobiles, helicopters or snowcats. Downhill skiing focuses on the use of turns to smoothly turn the skis from one direction to another. Additionally, the skier can use the same techniques to turn the ski away from the direction of movement, generating skidding forces between the skis and snow which further control the speed of the descent. Good technique results in a flowing motion from one descent angle to another one, adjusting the angle as needed to match changes in the steepness of the run. This looks more like a single series of S's then turns followed by straight sections. -From Wikipedia

Variations of Alpine Skiing

  • Freestyle
  • Arial
  • Mogul
  • Halfpipe
  • Extreme
  • Backcountry
  • Para-Alpine
  • Ski Cross
  • Ski Jumping
  • Slope Style

Cross Country (Nordic)

Cross CountryCross Country skiing is travel on skis over snow-covered terrain, whereby skiers rely on their own locomotion rather than on ski lifts or other forms of assistance. Modern cross-country skiing shares self-locomotion as a core attribute with the original form of skiing from which all skiing disciplines evolved, including alpine skiing, ski jumping and telemark skiing. It is widely practiced as a sport and recreational activity, however some still use it as a means of transportation. Variants of cross-country skiing are adapted to a range of terrain which spans unimproved, sometimes mountainous terrain to groomed courses that are specifically designed for the sport. Skiers propel themselves either by striding forward (classic style) or side-to-side in a skating motion (skate skiing), aided by arms pushing on ski poles against the snow. It is practiced in regions with snow-covered landscapes, including Northern Europe, Canada, Russia and regions in the United States. Competitive cross-country skiing is one of the Nordic skiing sports. Cross-country skiing and rifle marksmanship are the two components of biathlon, ski-orienteering is a form of cross-country skiing, which includes map navigation along snow trails and tracks -From Wikipedia

Telemark (Cross of Alpine and Cross-country)

TelemarkTelemark skiing is a ski technique that combines elements of Alpine and Nordic skiing. Telemark skiing is named after the Telemark region of Norway, where the discipline originated. Sondre Norheim is often credited for first demonstrating the turn in ski races, which included cross country, slalom and jumping, in Norway around 1868. Sondre Norheim also experimented with ski and binding design, introducing side cut to skis and heel bindings (like a cable). Telemark skiing was reborn in 1971, in the United States. Doug Buzzell, Craig Hall. Greg Dalbey, Jack Marcial, and Rick Borcovec are credited reintroducing the style after reading the book "Come Ski With Me" by Stein Eriksen. Telemark skiing gained popularity during the 1970s and '80s. Telemark equipment crosses Alpine and Nordic ski gear. Generally, Telemark skiers use Alpine skis with specially designed Nordic style bindings that fix only the toe of the ski boot to the ski, thereby creating the “free heel.” Telemark turns use a distinct lunging motion to engage the ski in a powerful yet graceful arc. -From Wikipedia