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We look back at the winners of the Open Championship since 2006 and reveal what it takes to win the year's third Major Why You Must Break 70 in Round 1 to Win The Open
As everyone knows, you have to be at your absolute best to land any of golf’s major championship. But does that mean being at your best at certain points, or over the entirety of the tournament?
The Open Championship is different to golf’s other three Majors in the sense that the weather plays such a significant role. An over-par round might be excellent if the conditions are poor, or dreadful if you’re on the good side of the draw and conditions are benign.
With all that in mind, we’ve gone back over the last 11 years to see what the average score compiled by the winners in each round is.
Of course, the disparate nature of conditions and courses means some years are considerably tougher than others, but it’s interesting to take a look nonetheless.
The only player to shoot an over-par opening round and still win The Open since 2006 is Padraig Harrington, who shot a 74 in 2008 – five shots higher than the next-worst Thursday performance.
The key finding is that, in 11 of the last 12 years, the eventual winner has broken par in the first round. In fact, the average round-one scoring average is 67.4 – a shot less than the second-best day for scoring, Sunday, and 2.4 shots lower than the worst day, Saturday. It’s ironic that round three is often referred to as moving day. That certainly doesn’t apply in the Open.
By contrast, five champions shot rounds in the 70s on Friday, six did so on Saturday and four failed to record sub-70 scores on Sunday.

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Open Championship Golf Betting Tips

Open Championship Golf Betting Tips
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Open Championship Tee Times 2018

Open Championship Tee Times 2018
Who will be hitting the first tee shot…

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Open Championship TV Coverage 2018

Open Championship TV Coverage 2018
Here we take a look at how to…
So, the formula seems pretty clear this week: shoot a good score on Thursday. If you do that, it gives you a great platform to push on, a buffer against potential bad weather and the opportunity to have a bad round and still contend in the tournament.
However, there are constraints when it comes to the bad round. Since 2006, no one has shot a 75 or above and gone on to win the Claret Jug.
Will this trend continue at the 2018 Open Championship? We will wait and see
This article Why You Must Break 70 in Round 1 to Win The Open appeared first on Golf Monthly.

The rapid rise of Englishman Andrew 'Beef' Johnston reached record highs at Troon last year, where his golf backed-up his personalityHow Andrew ‘Beef’ Johnston Won Hearts At The Open
Wherever Andrew Johnston walked at The Open 2016, he left behind a stream of beaming smiles. It’s partly because he never stops smiling himself and it’s infectious.
He looked like ‘one of us’ and behaved a bit like he couldn’t believe he was playing in The Open, but then he teed it up, smashed the ball over 300 yards down the middle and reminded us that he’s the real thing, and that he shouldn’t be with us on the other side of the rope at all.
Beef showed us that he’s the best torch bearer for Britain’s young golfers since Rory McIlroy won The Open three years ago.
We saw something fresh and authentic about Beef last year and it’s something that can’t be manufactured by marketers.
Andrew Johnston during the final round of the 145th Open Championship at Royal Troon (David Cannon/R&A/R&A via Getty Images)
Broad smiles aside, Johnston gave the final round of The Open everything he could in trying to close the gap between the field and high-flying Henrik Stenson and Phil Mickelson.
Johnston birdied three of the first four holes at Royal Troon on day four, playing in the penultimate pairing with American Bill Haas, to energise the Troon galleries.
Continues below

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Building The Perfect Links Golfer

Building The Perfect Links Golfer
Links courses provide the ultimate golfing test. We…

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Justin Rose And The Open: Unfinished Business

Justin Rose And The Open: Unfinished Business
Having narrowly missed out on this year's Masters,…

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Open Championship Golf Betting Tips

Open Championship Golf Betting Tips
Who is going to make you some money…
He would never have caught an inspired Stenson anyway, playing the round of his life behind Beef, but the Englishman’s result of eighth on three under par helped further established him in golf’s majors set.
England’s Andrew Johnston waves to the spectators on the 18th during his final round 73 on day four of the 2016 Open Golf Championship at Royal Troon. (GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images)
“I started off pretty good but my short game was not good enough today,” said north Londoner Johnston, 27, after his round.
“There was a better score to be had but I gave it my best so no regrets.
“I’ve had a fantastic week. The crowds have been incredible, man. They left me speechless. I was shocked at the first when I holed the [birdie] putt, and they went absolutely crazy down there. And then coming down 18, I’ll remember it forever.”Story courtesy of Mercedes-Benz, Official Car and Official Patron of The Open
This article How Andrew ‘Beef’ Johnston Won Hearts At The Open appeared first on Golf Monthly.

The world’s best golfers are in Scotland this week for the 147th Open Championship. Jordan Spieth is the defending champion at Carnoustie Golf Links in Angus.Open previewThe Open Championship PreviewThe 147th Open Championship will take place this week at Carnoustie in Angus, Scotland. Jordan Spieth is the defending champion and the world’s best are ready for battle over the firm and fast links.
Jordan Spieth comes into the event as defending champion, but he is not favourite with the bookmakers following a struggle with recent form. Most are giving favourite status to World Number 1 Dustin Johnson with England’s Justin Rose not too far behind. There’s a strong case to be made for the chances of many of the world’s top-ranked players but Rickie Fowler is much fancied given his strong links record and good performance in last week’s Scottish Open, also U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka who has been a runner-up in the Dunhill Links (an event that includes a round at Carnoustie.)
Justin Rose will be among the favourites
Justin Rose is part of a strong contingent of British and Northern Irish players looking to secure a home victory. Rory McIlroy will be aiming to claim a second Open title following his 2014 win at Hoylake and Tommy Fleetwood will be looking to draw on good memories of his course record 63 at Carnoustie in last year’s Dunhill Links.
This will be the eighth time Carnoustie has welcomed The Open Championship and there have been some superb contests over the great Angus links. Tommy Armour was champion in 1931 and then Henry Cotton in 1937. Ben Hogan played and won his only Open at Carnoustie in 1953 and Gary Player took the title in 1968. Tom Watson claimed the first of his five Open victories here in 1975 and Paul Lawrie was a worthy home winner in 1999. Last time out at Carnoustie, Padraig Harrington came through a thrilling playoff against Sergio Garcia to win the first of his back-to-back Opens.
Padraig Harrington won in 2007Read more on the history of The Open at Carnoustie here.
The course at Carnoustie is known as one of the toughest tests in world golf. Owing to the dry weather that has prevailed over the past two months, the course is set to be firm and fast-running. This means an extra emphasis on strategy, particularly from the tee. Players will have to assess the best method for staying out of Carnoustie’s magnetic and punishing bunkering. Many will choose to lay up short of the traps but the longer hitters may opt to hit driver to try and fly all the trouble – Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy have already suggested this will be their plan.
It’s a tough track but it doesn’t look like the wind will be too much of a factor this week, so we could well see lower scoring than previous instalments of The Open at Carnoustie. As ever with the links though, the weather can turn quickly and the players will be ready for the test to intensify.
The Open Championship is the most historic and coveted individual prize in men’s golf. First contested in 1860, this will be the 147th instalment of the great event.
The competition was born when James Ogilvy Fairlie, a co-founder of Prestwick Golf Club and a close friend of Old Tom Morris, decided a professional tournament would raise Prestwick’s standing as a golf club. At Fairlie’s instigation, Prestwick sent letters to the leading British Clubs, inviting them to send their professionals for a competition to be held over the links in October 1860. There were eight entrants and Willie Park Snr of Musselburgh was the winner.
For that first Open Championship a red morocco leather and silver ‘Challenge Belt’ was on offer to the winner. No prizemoney was up for grabs, although the professionals were able to earn some pay by caddying for Prestwick members during the week of the competition.
Things have changed a little since then. The winner this week will walk away with the Claret Jug (brought in for the 1873 Open after Young Tom Morris had been allowed to keep the belt following three straight wins) plus a cheque for $1,890,000 and all the trappings that go along with being the “champion golfer for the year.”Venue: Carnoustie Golf Links, Angus, ScotlandDate: Jul 19-22Course stats: par 71, 7,402 yardsPurse: $10,500,000 Winner: $1,890,000Defending champion: Jordan Spieth (-12)How to watch The Open ChampionshipTV Coverage:
Thursday 12 – Sky Sports Golf and Sky Sports Main Event from 6.30am
Friday 13 – Sky Sports Golf and Sky Sports Main Event from 6.30am
Saturday 14 – Sky Sports Golf and Sky Sports Main Event from 9am
Sunday 15 – Sky Sports Golf and Sky Sports Main Event from 8amNot a Sky Sports customer and want to watch The Open Championship?
Why not buy a Now TV pass? For £7.99 you can get a day pass if you wish to watch one of the rounds or, for just £12.99, you can get a week pass to see the whole tournament.Buy a Now TV Sky Sports Day Pass for £7.99Buy a Now TV Sky Sports Week Pass for £12.99Players to watch:Amongst the Favourites –
Rickie Fowler: The American is one of the most imaginative players in the game and he loves links golf. He’s been a runner-up back in 2014 and he has a good record in the Scottish Open – a winner in 2015.The next tier –
Tyrrell Hatton – Another man who plays well on the links, Hatton has won the last two Dunhill Links titles with rounds played at Carnoustie. He was tied ninth last week at Gullane.An outsider –
Ryan Fox – The big-hitting New Zealander was runner-up in Ireland and then played well again at Gullane. With his power, he could take many of the bunkers out of play at Carnoustie and that could be a big advantage.
CarnoustieKey holes: The finishing three. The 16th is a huge par-3 that can be stretched over 250 yards, the 17th is a complicated par-4 where the players must be accurate with placement from the tee to avoid the snaking Barry Burn. The 18th is, arguably, the toughest finishing hole in golf. The Burn lurks left and right from the tee, out-of-bounds threatens all down the left side while bunkers protect the right. The burn waits again short of the green with bunkers right and OB left and long… It’s witnessed disasters in the past and will likely do so again.
This article The Open Championship Preview appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Ahead of the most unpredictable Major of the year, Nick Bonfield looks at five 2018 Open outsiders who could do something unexpected at CarnoustieJorge Campillo has played some fine golf this season5 2018 Open Outsiders Worth BackingThe Open Championship is the toughest of all tournaments to predict – a product of the terrain it’s played over, weather conditions and the significance of the draw, among other factors.
It’s therefore important to look a long way down the list of contenders when selecting your bets, and to consider focusing more attention than normal on the each-way market.
This year, the difficulty of Carnoustie and the sheer number of top-tier players entering the event in good form have contributed to some excellent odds for the lesser lights, in relative terms, in the field.
Below, I look at five 2018 Open outsiders who warrant some attention in the betting markets. For the record, I view an outsider as anyone who’s 50/1 or longer.Related: Which Open Championship favourites to backLouis Oosthuizen – 66/1
Louis Oosthuizen is quietly having a pretty good season. The South African – who won the 2010 Open at St Andrews and lost out in a play-off at the same venue five years later – has six top-16 finishes in his last nine worldwide starts, including The Masters and the US Open.
Oosthuizen has one of the best swings in the game and his ball-striking skills will be of great benefit on the Open rota’s most demanding golf course. His short game has also been good this season, so if he finds some form on the greens I’d expect to find him towards the top of the leaderboard come championship Sunday.Bubba Watson – 70/1
I can’t believe Bubba Watson is being offered by the major bookmakers at such a high price. Granted, he’s never recorded a top ten in The Open, but he finished 27th last year at Birkdale and his game does seem to suit links golf, on paper at least. He’ll figure it out sooner rather than later, I suspect.
One thing’s for sure: he’ll be supremely confident heading to Carnoustie. After a spell of inauspicious form, Watson has won three times on the PGA Tour in 2018. He’s hard to ignore at his current price.Andy Sullivan – 125/1
Andy Sullivan has been on a fairly impressive run of late. He hasn’t missed a cut since the 2017 Italian Open and he’s notched three top-ten finishes in his last four starts, including a tie for 6th at the Irish Open, played over the Glashedy links at Ballyliffin.
The Englishman is happy off the golf course and almost at the level that saw him earn a Ryder Cup berth two years ago. He’s a good links player, he’s finished inside the top 30 in two of his three Open appearances and his stats this season are very good indeed – he’s 12th on the European Tour in GIR, 10th in Putts per Round and second in Stroke Average.

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Open Championship Golf Betting Tips

Open Championship Golf Betting Tips
Who is going to make you some money…

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Your Ultimate Carnoustie Golf Guide

Your Ultimate Carnoustie Golf Guide
We take you through all 18 holes at…

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Open Championship TV Coverage 2018

Open Championship TV Coverage 2018
Here we take a look at how to…

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Open Championship Prize Money 2018

Open Championship Prize Money 2018
The purse has increased $250,000 on last year
Matthew Southgate – 200/1
Some of you may never have heard of Matthew Southgate, but he’s well worth considering if you’re looking for a long-shot each-way bet. Southgate was diagnosed with testicular cancer in July 2015, but he battled back to regain a European Tour card and finished 12th at Royal Troon in 2016.
Last year, he played some fine golf en route to a tie for sixth – arguably the most heart-warming storyline of the tournament. He’s struggled with injuries of late, but if he’s healthy, he’s someone to keep an eye on.Jorge Campillo – 300/1
Jorge Campillo has never won a European Tour event, and while I don’t expect him to reign supreme at The Open Championship, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if he sneaked into the each-way places. The Spaniard is currently enjoying his best season to date on the European Tour, and by some distance – he’s 9th on the Race to Dubai and he’s never cracked the top 40 before. This year, he’s registered six top-five finishes, including an outright third in the Irish Open.
For the latest Open news, check the Golf Monthly website and follow our social media channels
This article 5 2018 Open Outsiders Worth Backing appeared first on Golf Monthly.

TaylorMade GAPR Range Revealed - This new trio of utility clubs is said to perfectly fill the gaps in your long game
TaylorMade GAPR Range Revealed
TaylorMade, creator of the original Rescue line of hybrids in 1999, has unveiled its new GAPR clubs, each with unique identities and performance characteristics to help golfers fill the gaps in the long game.
Inside each of the three different GAPR models you can find TaylorMade’s SpeedFoam technology, which was first introduced in the P790 irons.
SpeedFoam serves the dual purpose of generating ball speed while also dampening vibrations to create optimal sound and feel. Additionally, strategically-placed ultra-low centre of gravity in each GAPR model creates a hotter, higher launch for more distance and improved playability.GAPR LO
Designed primarily for players with faster ball speeds, GAPR LO is the smallest of the three models and features a low-forward CG for extreme distance with a mid-to-low trajectory.
It’s driving iron-type shape has a players profile that allows for excellent flighting and workability, and the mid-thin sole width delivers maximum performance and versatility for the stronger player. It is available in 17°, 19° and 22° loft options.
GAPR MID
Slightly larger in size than the GAPR LO, GAPR MID was designed with players of all skill levels in mind.
Featuring a CG that is ultra-low and forward for maximum distance and a mid-high trajectory, GAPR MID has an iron face profile that inspires confidence and easy alignment and a medium-wide sole width for ease of play and versatility. It will come in 18°, 21° and 24° loft options.GAPR HI
The largest of the three models, GAPR HI features an ultra-low/back CG for maximum distance and a high, penetrating trajectory.
Where the HI differs from the other 2 models is its shaping, which features modern Rescue shaping with a high-toe, peanut shaped clubhead. The dropped crown feature provides lower CG and improved alignment. It will come in 19°, 22°, 25° and 28° lofts.
Each GAPR comes equipped with a KBS Hybrid shaft in either an 80/x, 80/s, 70/r or 60/a profile (via custom) and a Golf Pride Tour Velvet 360 grip. Additional shaft options are available through TaylorMade’s custom program as well. They will have an RRP of £259 each.
This article TaylorMade GAPR Range Revealed appeared first on Golf Monthly.

The 136th Open Championship at Carnoustie proved again that it wasn't quite Sergio Garcia's turn to lift the Claret Jug and claim his first major.Sergio Garcia (ESP) during the 2007 British Open of golf. (Photo by liewig christian/Corbis via Getty Images)2007 Open: Sergio Garcia So Close Yet So Far
Up until he finally secured his first and heavily deserved major title at Augusta in 2017, Sergio Garcia had done everything in the game but win one. In all four majors he had come close to getting the monkey off his back. With five top-10’s in six Open Championships for the Spaniard, Carnoustie in 2007 was no different.
Garcia headed into the final round with a three shot lead over Steve Stricker and hoped to win his first major title wire-to-wire.
After birding the 3rd hole to be the first player to get to double digits for the tournament, Garcia was looking very strong to get the job done. However Carnoustie produced it’s usual troubles and tribulations throughout the day. The infamous nickname ‘Carnastie’ was back in business.
The Spaniard produced three bogeys in four holes to end his front 9 on +2 for his round and 7-under for the tournament which at this stage had him tied for the lead with Padraig Harrington who was two holes ahead of him.Related: 2018 Open Championship Tee Times
The crazy roller-coaster round for Garcia continued into the back nine where he birdied holes 13 and 14 but then bogeyed 15.
Eventually he came to the 18th. 71 holes had been played and he was one shot clear going into the treacherous par-4 18th. 499 yards was all that separated between him and the Claret Jug. No one wanted a repeat of Jean Van de Velde 8 years previously, however Garcia needed to par the hole to win. That was no easy task.
Garcia couldn’t quite do the champions walk up the 18th fairway just yet when a 10 foot par putt was there staring him down on the green.
Sadly, Garcia’s lacklustre finishing touches at major championships continue as the putt lipped out to force a play off with Padraig Harrington.
Pressure got the better of Sergio almost immediately as he bogeyed the first hole of the four-hole playoff and ending up losing by a shot.
The 137th Open proved to be another year for the phrase ‘so close yet so far’ in relation to Sergio’s Major drought.

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Your Ultimate Carnoustie Golf Guide

Your Ultimate Carnoustie Golf Guide
We take you through all 18 holes at…

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Past Open Championship Winners At Carnoustie

Past Open Championship Winners At Carnoustie
Take a look at the past winners of…

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Open Championship TV Coverage 2018

Open Championship TV Coverage 2018
Here we take a look at how to…
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This article 2007 Open: Sergio Garcia So Close Yet So Far appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Ping i210 and i500 Irons Revealed - Everything you need to know about the new Ping i210 and i500 irons as well as the new Glide Forged wedge and Vault 2.0 Craz-E H putterPing i210 and i500 Irons Revealed
This summer, two new Ping irons will hit the shelves. While they both look fantastic, one has a focus on feel and precision while the other fits the mould of a players’ distance iron, providing speed and forgiveness in a compact package.
The i210 and i500 slot in between the compact iBlade and forgiving G400, offering slightly different looks and performance traits for the serious golfer.
The i500 is similar to G700 in that it has the look of a muscleback from behind but is in fact hollow.
It has a forged face made from the same C300 maraging steel as the G400 woods and G400 Crossover, which is extremely strong but also very flexible. As a result, it flexes at impact by two thirds of its own thickness, around five times as much as the face on the outgoing i200, for increased ball speed and distance.RELATED: Ping i500 Iron Review
The top rail also has more movement to it as well, creating a hinge-like effect that meant Ping could strengthen the lofts while maintaining a high launch with low spin. Visually, i500 has a clean, players-style look with sharp edges and premium finishing details.
The i210 has more of a focus on feel and precision. It is more traditionally lofted (7-iron is 33°) and features added elastomer in contact with the face, which means it should feel much softer than i200.
It also boasts a cleaner look at address thanks to crisper edges and the loft number being removed from the face.
RELATED: Ping i210 Iron Review
Big changes have also been made to the pitching and utility wedge within the i210 set, as the grooves have now have a sharper edge radius and have been spaced closer together.
This leads to more friction with the ball as well as more moisture and dirt being displaced, resulting in more consistent distances.
Both irons comes in a lower-lofted Power Spec as well as a new, higher lofted Retro Spec for golfers with less of a focus on distance or who want to hit the ball higher.
They also benefit from a new Hydropearl 2.0 chrome finish, which offers longer-lasting wear and more scratch resistance as well as the improved turf interaction and water repellency characteristics that help reduce flyers from the rough.
The i500 is a hollow iron with a forged face
The i500 irons will have an RRP of £149 per club in steel shafts, £159 in graphite. The i210 irons will have an RRP of £126 per club in steel shafts, £136 graphite. Both go on sale from July 31st.
Ping has also launched a new Glide Forged wedge. Available in lofts 50-60°, this compact, tour-inspired model features a tungsten toe weight for feel and stability, a more rounded lead edge with more heel and toe camber and Ping’s Hydropearl Chrome 2.0 finish.
It will be available from July 31st with an RRP of £200.
Topping off a host of new Ping clubs is the new Vault 2.0 Craz-E H putter. 
This heel-shafted mallet with an Anser-style hosel comes in Ping’s Stealth finish and features a stainless steel sole plate for stability, adjustable weights to fine-tune feel and TR grooves for a consistent roll. It will have an RRP of £275 from July 31st.
This article Ping i210 and i500 Irons Revealed appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Ping Prodi G Junior Range Unveiled - Ping is offering a free, one-time club adjustment service with its new Prodi G junior rangePing Prodi G Junior Range Unveiled
Ping has looked to address the frustration around the limited lifespan of junior golf clubs by offering a no-charge club adjustment service with its new Prodi G junior range.
Comprising a full set of clubs and bag optimised for ages 7-13, Ping’s unique offer looks set to ensure that as junior golfers grow, they are still using equipment correctly fitted for their size and swing. Parents can think of it as essentially buying two sets for the cost of one for their son or daughter.
The new lightweight, 15° 460cc Prodi G driver (RRP £215) features the same crown turbulators that can be seen on the adult G400 driver that reduce aerodynamic drag for added clubhead speed. There’s also a dragonfly crown to make the head’s weighting more efficient and a graphite shaft that provides a lightweight feel.
The Prodi G fairway wood (RRP £110) also features crown turbulators and comes in 22° of loft while the Prodi G hybrid (RRP £90) comes in 27° of loft.
The Prodi G irons (£60 per club) feature a CTP insert and graphite shafts to make them easier to swing. There are also Glide-style Prodi G wedges (RRP £60) that come in 52° and 56° of loft.
To help make a maestro on the greens, the Voss putter (RRP £60) features the original PP58 grip for enhanced feel and control.
To store all these clubs are two sizes of the Ping Hoofer Prodi G carry bags (RRP £120), both of which feature a 4-way top and adjustable dual straps for comfort.RELATED: Ping i500 Iron Review
To be eligible, you must purchase a minimum of five Prodi G junior clubs (any combination) in one transaction. The one-time, no-charge service is to have the clubs re-shafted or lengthened, re-weighted, and re-gripped to optimize performance as the golfer grows. The clubs do not need to be altered at the same time and there is no expiration date for the one-time opportunity.
The Ping Prodi G junior range goes on sale from July 31st.
This article Ping Prodi G Junior Range Unveiled appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Michael Kim of the USA finished on a record-breaking four-round total of 27-under-par to win the John Deere Classic by eight shots and earn a start in The Open at Carnoustie.MIchael Kim wins John Deere, earns Open startMichael Kim wins John Deere Classic and earns Open start
Michael Kim fired a closing round of 66 to cruise to victory in the John Deere Classic at TPC Deere Run in Illinois and earn a place in The Open Championship. The 25-year-old finished eight clear of Bronson Burgoon, Joel Dahmen, Sam Ryder and Francesco Molinari.

Final-round Sunday highlights from the @JDClassic: pic.twitter.com/rpVO09l4lx
— PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) July 16, 2018
Kim had missed five of his last six cuts heading into this event but he closed out his first PGA Tour victory in some style at TPC Deere Run.
The 25-year-old took a five-shot lead into Sunday and when he birdied his first three holes to take a seven-stroke advantage, the tournament was effectively over.
Kim held his nerve into the back nine and made another crucial birdie on the 16th hole. It took him beyond Steve Stricker’s tournament scoring record.
In 84 previous PGA Tour starts, Kim had only once finished in the top-10. Now he is a Tour winner and he will play in The Open at Carnoustie this week.
Michael Kim wins John Deere Classic
“To be able to finish out in style like this, it means a lot,” Kim said. “To be sitting here with a trophy, I’m at a loss for words. Even the last couple of weeks, I felt like my game was getting there. I just felt like I needed just a couple of good starts to the rounds.”
Italy’s Francesco Molinari was one of the players who tied for a distant second place in the event. He has been enjoying a superb season, following victory in the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth with a win on the PGA Tour in the Quicken Loans National. He closed with 64 at TPC Deere Run to claim a tie for second and to move into the top-30 on the FedEx Cup standings.
Francesco Molinari finished tied second
“I’m in a much stronger position now heading into the summer, and then The Playoffs, and so I need to keep it going,” he said. “Obviously, I would really like to make it to the TOUR Championship. I missed it by, I think, one shot last year, so I will do my best to be there in Atlanta.”
John Deere Classic
TPC Deere Run, Silvis, Illinois
12-15 July
Purse: $5,800,000 Par: 711 Michael Kim (USA) 63 64 64 66 257 $1,044,000T2 Bronson Burgoon (USA) 68 62 66 69 265 $382,800T2 Joel Dahmen (USA) 64 71 65 65 265 $382,800T2 Francesco Molinari (Ita) 65 66 70 64 265 $382,800
T2 Sam Ryder (USA) 66 66 67 66 265 $382,8006 Harold Varner III (USA) 67 65 66 68 266 $208,800T7 Chad Campbell (USA) 66 70 66 66 268 $168,780T7 John Huh (USA) 70 63 69 66 268 $168,780T7 Keith Mitchell (USA) 67 68 66 67 268 $168,780T7 Andres Romero (Arg) 64 71 64 69 268 $168,780T7 Kevin Streelman (USA) 66 71 66 65 268 $168,780
Note: Player score in bold signifies Titleist ball usage
This article Michael Kim wins John Deere Classic and earns Open start appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Wonderful memories will be created by the victor in The 147th Open at Carnoustie – but it’s stirring memories that is helping improve people’s lives in the Angus town says Ed Hodge.Carnoustie: Stirring Golfing Memories
Wonderful memories will be created by the victor in The 147th Open Championship at Carnoustie – but it’s stirring golfing memories that is helping improve people’s lives in the Angus town.
On the first Thursday of every month, a group of around 15 individuals meet in the new Carnoustie Links Golf Centre. With an average age of 78, they go down memory lane, looking at photos of past Open champions at Carnoustie such as Ben Hogan, Gary Player and Tom Watson, as well as sharing stories of their own golfing achievements.
They also strike a ball in the new simulator bays, play ‘The Nestie’ short six-hole par-3 course or try the public putting green, all this is in competition for their own ‘Claret Jug’ monthly award.
This is the Carnoustie Golf Memories Group, one of what is hoped will be a growing number that will spring up at golf facilities across the country, with others at Noah’s Ark in Perth and in Dumfries. They are part of the overall Golf Memories Project, which in turn is part of the wider Sports Heritage Scotland network helping those living with dementia and memory loss.
Scotland currently leads the world in reminiscence therapy. Football, cricket, curling, rugby and shinty are among the sports also involved, a collaborative effort of reminiscence groups to stir memories, fulfil lives and also encourage participants back into the sports they love.
“Through reminisce, we are reconnecting the members with their passion for golf through spending meaningful time with other golfers and enjoying the friendly banter”, says Lorraine Young, a key driving force for the golf group in Carnoustie. “After a diagnosis, it can very much feel like a loss of life, however this programme is helping people change their attitudes by demonstrating that you can live well with dementia or memory loss.
“Staff working at Carnoustie Golf Links have also participated in Dementia Friends Awareness Sessions, as have a number of other businesses throughout the town. Ultimately the aim is to make Carnoustie a truly Dementia Friendly Community. In support of this many of the shops in the town have dressed their windows to reflect our work linked to The Open of yesteryear.”
A former Chief Social Work Officer for Angus and a Rotarian, Lorraine chose to commit her free time to creating and supporting the development of Golf Memories. Launched in June 2015, the group has been meeting monthly ever since. The group is ably supported by a committed and dedicated team of local volunteers, such as David Taylor, Trevor Williamson and Margaret Muir.
“As well as reminisce, they are also getting back into the physical act of playing golf,” explains Lorraine. “For many, when they have a diagnosis of dementia, they believe they can’t play golf anymore or have a place in clubs. What we’re trying to do is show that physical activity and social interaction are very important by supporting members to reconnect with what for many has been a lifelong passion.
“What better setting for golf than here at Carnoustie which is steeped in history. We’re trying to get people back into playing the game as much as is physically possible.”
Gary Player’s famous victory at Carnoustie 50 years ago is celebrated in an exhibition on the bottom floor of the clubhouse, with The Open stands also creating a great buzz among the group as the world’s greatest golfers prepare to descend on the famous links.
Lorraine adds: “There has been amazing excitement. The stories that have been coming out from the group have been beyond our hopes and dreams about previous Open Championships, things that as organisers even we didn’t know about. They have also been bringing in photos from home that we’ve never seen and that has stimulated amazing conversations. We believe the work we are doing is having a significant impact.”
Bernie Mortimer, 78, is a member of the group, who used to live in Carnoustie but now stays further up the coast in Arbroath. “I’ve met people I used to know and all the work is helping jog my memory,” he says. “I enjoy the groups, seeing people on a regular basis and reconnecting with them. I’ve seen a few Opens in my day and I look forward to next month.”
Stories abound, as Lorraine continues, her face lighting up as she retells: “We have a lady who attended our group, who used walking aids and needed a lot of support from a mobility point of view. But when we got her into the simulation bay and placed a golf club in her hands, she stood up straight as a die and must have gone back about 40 years. She hit the sweetest and purest of shots, it was a delight to watch. That is what it is all about, as well as the stories and the camaraderie.”
Michael Wells, Chief Executive at Carnoustie Golf Links, is a great supporter of the work and said: “The Golf Memories Group in Carnoustie is close to our hearts. Partnering with people like Golf Memories helps us to engage with the community and it’s really nice to be able to give something back, giving them access to the clubhouse and looking after them.
“We really enjoy the association with Golf Memories and this is a genuine, good cause. What we’re trying to do here at Carnoustie is to be accessible for everybody.”
Lorraine adds: “Michael, Colin Sinclair, the PGA Head Professional, and other staff, are extremely helpful and supportive and without the level of endorsement, afforded to us by the Carnoustie Golf Links and staff, most of what we aim to do, would not be possible.”
Kevin Barker, Director – Golf Development at The R&A, kindly handed over tickets to The Open for the Memories Group earlier this week as excitement builds. Members and their carers will now be enabled to attend The 147th Open here at Carnoustie.
This article Stirring Golfing Memories at Carnoustie appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Forty-two club golfers competed in the second playing of The R&A's 9 Hole Championship Final at Carnoustie yesterday. 1999 Champion Golfer Paul Lawrie with the finalists of The R&A 9-Hole ChampionshipClub Golfers Play on Golf’s Greatest Stage at Carnoustie
The Final was contested over the first four and last five holes of the Championship Course at the famous Angus links before The 147th Open Championship to be held this week.
Christopher Cudahy and Andrew Sabin of Tadmarton Heath in Banbury, England were the overall winners of the Stableford competition. The pair returned a winning nett aggregate score of 41 to be crowned champions.
Christopher Cudahy and Andrew Sabin of Tadmarton Heath
Dunblane New in Scotland, represented by Gary Aitken and Richard McLuckie, finished runners-up, ahead of 10-year-old Evan Taylor and Andy Drees from Foxhills, England.
Champion Golfer Paul Lawrie, together with Bruce Mitchell, Captain of The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews, presented the prizes to the leading teams.
“To play Carnoustie in its best condition just before The Open was a real privilege and it was exciting, thrilling golf”, said Cudahy. “It feels brilliant to have won the Final and it was a great experience.
“We were playing just ahead of Adam Scott and Rory McIlroy, who were practising on the course, so we felt like we were really part of The Open. The R&A have done a great job and I am sure the nine hole event will go from strength to strength.”
Sabin added, “When you stand on the 1st tee and they call your name out, with all the grandstands around you, it raises the hairs on the back of your neck. It’s a nerve-wracking but fantastic experience. I will remember it for years to come.”
Over 15,000 golfers entered nine hole qualifying events held at clubs throughout Great Britain and Ireland; more than double the number who played in 2017.
The R&A 9 Hole Championship is central to the organisation’s drive to promote this form of golf as an ideal way to enjoy playing the sport in less time, either recreationally or competitively for handicap purposes.
Duncan Weir, Executive Director – Golf Development at The R&A said, “The finalists have had a great experience today and they revelled in the challenge of playing one of the world’s most famous courses.
“We are already looking forward to repeating this exercise at Royal Portrush in 2019.”
Please visit www.randa.org/9HoleChampionship for more information.
This article Club Golfers Play on Golf’s Greatest Stage at Carnoustie appeared first on Golf Monthly.

We take a look at the equipment Jordan Spieth is using ahead of The Open ChampionshipJordan Spieth What’s In The Bag?
Here we take a look at the Titleist equipment used by defending champion Jordan Spieth ahead of the Open Championship.
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Jordan Spieth What’s In The Bag? – As of Masters 2018
The Texan has used Titleist equipment for his entire professional career and in his amateur days and currently has the Titleist 915 driver in the bag as well as the 915 3-wood and a Titleist 816 H2 hybrid. All of his woods are fitted with Graphite Design shafts.
(Photo by Darren Carroll/Getty Images)
All of his irons and wedges are new 2017 and 2018 models. He carries a 718 T-MB 4-iron and 718 AP2 irons from 5-9.
The three-time major winner then has four Titleist Vokey SM7 wedges in 46°, 52°, 56° and 60° lofts.
Spieth is known as the world’s best putter and uses his trusty Scotty Cameron Circle T 009 to do the job. He’s had this in his bag for nearly 10 years now and it’s pictured below.
Spieth’s putter. (@JonathanRWall on twitter)
He said of the putter, “The 009 was my favourite putter [as a junior golfer]. Adam Scott and Geoff Ogilvy, two of my favourite golfers, used it, and that got me. I’ve been using it since I was 15, and I won’t be changing anytime soon.”
As well as a full bag of Titleist equipment, Speith also wears the new Under Armour Spieth 2 shoes, which he helped to design.Jordan Spieth What’s In The Bag?Driver: Titleist 915D2 9.5°, Graphite Design Tour AD IZ-6XFairway wood: Titleist 915 15°, Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 7XHybrid: Titleist 816 H2 21°, Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 95X4-iron: Titleist 718 T-MB, True Temper Project X 6.55-9 irons: Titleist 718 AP2, True Temper Project X 6.5Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 46° with True Temper Project X 6.5 and, 52°, 56° and 60° with True Temper Project X 6.0Putter: Titleist Scotty Cameron Circle T 009 with SuperStroke Flatso 1.0 gripBall: Titleist Pro V1xShoes: Under Armour Spieth 2
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This article Jordan Spieth What’s In The Bag? appeared first on Golf Monthly.

The 12 Best Open Championship Rounds - Here we take a look at 12 of the finest rounds in the history of The Open ChampionshipThe 12 Best Open Championship RoundsThe Open returns to Carnoustie this year after one of the best rounds in major championship history last time out at Royal Birkdale.
Branden Grace shot a 62 which was the first time the score had ever been shot in a men’s major championship.
There was another stunning round in the previous year, as Henrik Stenson fired a 63 on Sunday at Troon to win his first major.
Here we run through 12 of the best rounds in Open history…Ben Hogan – Carnoustie 1953
Having won The Masters and the U.S. Open earlier in the year, Ben Hogan travelled across the Atlantic to compete in The Open Championship for the first and only time, at Carnoustie in Angus. “The Hawk” had never played on the links and never played with the (then) smaller British ball. He practised at Panmure before coming through qualifying on the Championship and Burnside courses at Carnoustie. He went into the final round tied for the lead with Roberto De Vicenzo and, despite battling the flu and having already played 18-holes in the morning, he went round the challenging layout at Carnoustie in a course-record 68 to win by four shots.Johnny Miller – Royal Birkdale 1976
The American went into the final round at Birkdale trailing a charismatic Spanish teenager called Seve Ballesteros by three shots. Johnny Miller had won 14 tournaments in the previous two seasons on the PGA Tour and had been U.S. Open champion in 1973. Ballesteros was an unknown and had never won a European Tour event. Over the last 18-holes Miller’s experience told and he carded a marvellous six-under par 66 that included an eagle on the 13th and birdies at the last two holes.Tom Watson – Turnberry 1977
The famous “Duel in the Sun” between Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus. Both men carded the same scores in the first three rounds: 68, 70 and then a fantastic 65. They took a three shot lead over Ben Crenshaw into Saturday’s final round and then accelerated away from the field. Trading birdies over the closing 18, Watson eventually prevailed with another 65, compared to Nicklaus’s 66. The next placed man was Hubert Green – 10 behind Nicklaus. “I won the tournament I played in,” he quipped afterwards.Seve Ballesteros – Royal Lytham 1988
The three men in contention to win the rain-delayed 1988 Open at Lytham played together in the final round. Seve Ballesteros and Nick Faldo trailed Nick Price by two shots. Faldo fell off the pace on the front nine as the other men ripped it up in a superb battle on the links. Price played the six holes from the 6th to the 11th in four-under-par but his one-shot lead was turned into a one-shot deficit over that stretch by Ballesteros who covered the holes in six-under! Seve played a sublime second to the 16th and then hit a majestic chip shot on the 18th hole to secure a par, a round of 65 and a two-shot victory. It was surely the best round of his life.Greg Norman –Royal St George’s 1993
The scoring at Royal St George’s was excellent in 1993. After rounds of 66, 68 and 69, Greg Norman trailed his great rival Nick Faldo by a shot going into the last day. The Australian was tied with Masters champion Bernhard Langer. Both Faldo and Langer closed with fine rounds of 67 but they couldn’t live with the brilliance of Norman. The Australian tore round St George’s in 64 for the lowest final round in Open Championship history.Nick Price – Turnberry 1994
Jesper Parnevik birdied the 16th and 17th holes to go two clear of Price at Turnberry and it looked as though the Zimbabwean would, once again, narrowly miss out on Open glory.
But Price then produced a remarkable finish. After birdieing the 16th, he holed a monster putt across the 17th green for an eagle. Parnevik bogeyed the last and Price parred for a one-stroke victory. He had closed with a scintillating 66.

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Justin Leonard – Royal Troon 1997
Leonard was five shots back of Jesper Parnevik at the start of the final round and few thought he would be the one to challenge the Swede’s lead on Sunday. But the young American put on a putting masterclass over the closing 18 holes to card a fabulous 65 and win by three from Parnevik and Darren Clarke.Paul Lawrie – Carnoustie 1999
This Open is always remembered for Jean Van de Velde’s disastrous finish. But just as incredible was Paul Lawrie’s final round of 67. The Scot was 10 shots off the lead after three rounds and wasn’t even in the top-10. But a four-under par 67 over the fiendishly difficult course at Carnoustie set a clubhouse total that was good enough to force a playoff which he subsequently won.Padraig Harrington – Royal Birkdale 2008
The Irishman trailed Greg Norman by a shot going into the final round and he was still one back with nine to play. But the defending champion played a wonderful back nine to secure a second Open victory. He birdied the 13th and 15th holes to move three clear and then sealed the title with a brilliant second shot to the par-5 17th. He made an eagle and went on to sign for a 69 and a four-shot victory.Phil Mickelson – Muirfield 2013
Phil Mickelson trailed Lee Westwood by five shots with one round to play at Muirfield. But as Westy faltered, Lefty surged. The American reached the turn in two-under to get within striking distance and he finished brilliantly with four birdies in his last six holes. His closing 66 was good enough for a three-shot win. Mickelson later called it the best round of his career.2016 – Henrik Stenson
Stenson became the first man from Sweden to win a major championship after a truly phenomenal round at Royal Troon in 2016. Despite a bogey on the opening hole, Stenson shot a 63 to equal the lowest round shot in a major and edge out Phil Mickelson in what went down as perhaps the best final day duel in the tournament’s history.2017 – Branden Grace
Branden Grace pipped Stenson by a stroke the next year at Royal Birkdale in shooting 62, the lowest ever round in a major championship. The South African carded a flawless eight birdies and 10 pars on Saturday including a clutch two putt from long of the 18th green.
This article The 12 Best Open Championship Rounds appeared first on Golf Monthly.

The History Of The Open At Carnoustie - Carnoustie has hosted seven Open Championships with winners including Henry Cotton, Ben Hogan, Gary Player and Tom WatsonThe History Of The Open At CarnoustieThe Open takes place at Carnoustie once again this year for the eighth time and first since 2007.
The tough Angus links is often referred to as ‘Carnasty’ and has produced some big-name winners including Ben Hogan and Gary Player.
Here we take a journey back in time to look at what happened in those previous tournaments…1953 – Ben Hogan
In 1949 Ben Hogan was almost killed in an horrific car crash that left him with a broken collarbone, a smashed rib, a double fracture of the pelvis and a broken ankle. Many people feared ‘The Hawk’ would never play golf again.
But Hogan confounded the sceptics by returning to top-level golf and winning six further Majors. It was fitting his only appearance in the Open came at Carnoustie because he had much in common with the course. The words tenacious, uncompromising and proud are frequently used in descriptions of both.
Aged 40, Hogan was under pressure to make the journey across the Atlantic to compete on a links. Legend has it Gene Sarazen told him he couldn’t be considered a true great until he had won the Open Championship. Towards the end of his life ‘The Squire’ denied any coercion. “Nah, his going over there had nothing to do with me”, said a 97-year-old Sarazen.
“Hogan never did anything he didn?t want to.”
Whatever it was that compelled Hogan to make the journey, he came to Scotland to win. He had already claimed the Masters and the US Open that year and wanted to add the Claret Jug to his collection. He arrived in Scotland two weeks before the event to acclimatise, to practise on the links and get used to playing with the smaller British ball.
Hogan’s performance at the 1953 Open highlighted the meticulous approach essential for success around the Championship Links at Carnoustie.
Arrangements were made for him to prepare at nearby Panmure. Accompanied by caddie Cecil Timms, the American methodically familiarised himself with a completely different type of golf. At one point Timms was instructed to stand on a green to gauge the reaction of the smaller ball as it landed. He was told the first 10 balls would be landing on the front-right portion of the green, the second 10 on the front-left, the next 10 on the back-right and so on. Pretty impressive when you consider Hogan was firing in 2-irons.
Hogan’s approach to Carnoustie was spot on. He realised the importance of finding the narrow fairways so he practised hard to get his long game in top order. Of the notoriously punishing gorse, he later said, “I don?t know what you do if you get into it, and I never wanted to find out. I didn’t practise getting out of the gorse because I figured anyone who went into it frequently wouldn’t have a chance anyway.”
Hogan started unspectacularly with a 73, but then improved every round with scores of 71, 70 and 68 for a total of 282, then an Open record. He won by four shots from his friend Frank Stranahan, Argentinian Antonio Cerda, Peter Thomson of Australia and Welshman Dai Rees.
Hogan had won the hearts of the British golfing public. He displayed courage and excellence to triumph around the most difficult links on the Open rota.1931 – Tommy Armour
The winner of the first Open at Carnoustie in 1931 was also a popular one. Tommy Armour was born in Edinburgh in 1894. He fought in the First World War where he rose to the rank of Staff Major before losing his sight in one eye during a mustard gas attack. Although he emigrated to the US in the 1920s the home crowd still looked on him as one of their own.
‘The Silver Scot’, as Armour was known, entered the final round five shots off the pace but a closing 71 (then a tie for the course record) gave him a total of 296.
Argentina’s Jose Jurado ended as Armour’s closest challenger. He could have forced a play-off had he not fallen foul of a miscalculation on the 18th.Thinking he needed a five to tie, he laid up short of the Barry Burn with his second shot. He pitched on and two-putted for five. Upon leaving the green he was made aware he had actually needed a four to match Armour’s score. It wouldn’t be the last time Carnoustie’s 18th would witness an error in judgement.1937 – Henry Cotton
In time for the 1937 Open, local man James Wright completed a redesign of the final three holes. James Braid had reworked the course in 1926 but it was thought by many his finish wasn’t stern enough and Wright’s alterations have remained largely unchanged to this day.
Britain’s Henry Cotton won the second of this three Open titles in 1937. Despite appalling conditions he outlasted the opposition, returning a total of 290, including a fabulous final round of 71 in pouring rain. Cotton’s main worry as he sat in the clubhouse was that the final round would be abandoned due to the course becoming unplayable. The round was completed despite the deluge (just) and Cotton lifted the Claret Jug.1968 – Gary Player
At 7,252 yards the Carnoustie course prepared for the 1968 Open was the longest in Championship history. Another first that year was the introduction of a 36-hole cut and only the top 80 and ties would be eligible to complete the final two rounds.
The first round confirmed the challenge posed by the Angus links as only four players broke par. Doug Sanders had a harder time than most. He received a Panmure rather than Carnoustie scorecard to mark at the start of his round.
As is often the case at Carnoustie, the tournament turned into an endurance test: an examination of the players’ grit and determination. This suited South Africa’s Gary Player, a ferocious competitor. He came out on top in an epic struggle with Jack Nicklaus, Bob Charles and Billy Casper to claim his second Open victory.
The defining moment came at the par-5 14th, Spectacles. Tied for the lead, Player reached for his 3-wood and blasted his second shot to two feet, setting up an eagle three. It was one of the greatest shots in Open history.

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1975 – Tom Watson
The 1975 Open was marked by a first and a last. Tom Watson turned up to the competition a complete links novice but, unperturbed by the alien playing surface, the 25-year-old American returned three good rounds in relatively benign weather to enter the final day just three off the pace. In worsening conditions Watson dug deep to record a level-par round and finish tied with Jack Newton on 279.
The resulting 18-hole play-off would be the Open’s last. The pair were locked right up until the final hole when Newton found sand with his second. Watson made regulation par and claimed the first of his five Open titles.
1999 – Paul Lawrie
The Open visited Carnoustie once again in 1999 when the links witnessed one of the most enthralling and controversial tournaments in Open history. Treacherous rough, a winning total of +6, a play-off and a Frenchman going doolally.
Perfect growing conditions in the run-up to the Championship meant the playing surfaces were in great shape but that the rough was knee-high. The combination of this and fairways that could be crossed in three strides resulted in one of the most challenging golf tournaments ever held.
The field finished the week a combined 2,660 over par. Sergio Garcia missed the cut on +30, first-round leader Rod Pampling shot 86 in the second round to go home early, Greg Norman had an air shot and Tiger Woods shot +10 and still finished tied seventh. “Give us some room, give us a chance to play,” he said.
Going into the final round, Jean Van de Velde held a five-shot lead over Craig Parry and Justin Leonard. Scotland’s Paul Lawrie was seemingly out of contention 10 shots back. The Frenchman appeared to be cruising and could afford a double-bogey at the final hole to win. Cue a farce of monumental proportions.
Van de Velde fired his second shot at the right-hand grandstand and it ricocheted backwards into deep rough. He then hacked it into the Barry Burn. After going in to inspect it he dropped backwards, chopped it into the greenside bunker and courageously got up and down for a seven. It dropped him back into a tie with Leonard and Lawrie who had surged up the leaderboard. The Scotsman then took control of the four-hole play-off to become the first Scottish Open winner since Sandy Lyle in 1985.
Those who have attempted to downgrade Lawrie’s achievement are wide of the mark. The Scot fired an awesome 67 in the final round then birdied the last two holes of the play-off to secure a deserved victory. On a monstrously difficult golf course it was the Aberdonian who lasted the distance.2007 – Padraig Harrington
The 2007 Open at Carnoustie was almost as dramatic at the 1999 playing, with three men vying for the Claret Jug on Sunday afternoon.
Three men – Padraig Harrington, Sergio Garcia and Andres Romero – were all in the hunt and none of them had ever tasted major glory before.
Romero had made an astonishing 10 birdies on Sunday but finished double-bogey to miss out by a single stroke at -6.
Padraig Harrington shot 67 (-4) on the final day and made a clutch double on the 72nd hole after visiting the infamous Barry Burn twice.
That left Sergio Garcia, widely considered as one of the best players to never win a major, with a one stroke lead coming down 18, although he would lip out for the Championship after failing to get up and down from the greenside bunker.
The Irishman defeated the Spaniard in the playoff to win his first of three majors and leave Garcia in despair.
This article The History Of The Open At Carnoustie appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Carnoustie Golf Links Championship Course Review - Carnoustie will examine every element of your game and call for length and accuracy, strategic thinking, nerve and staminaCarnoustie Golf Links Championship Course Review
Carnoustie hosts The Open for the eighth time this year.
Click here for our ‘Ultimate Carnoustie Guide‘ featuring drone footage and playing advice on every hole, course scorecard, travel info and much more!
Green Fee Range: £82.50-£175
Medal Tee: Par 72 – 6,948 Yards
Visitor Times: Monday to Friday – 09:00-16:00, Saturday from 14:00, Sunday from 11:30
Website: www.carnoustiegolflinks.co.ukCarnoustie Golf Links Championship Course Review
There’s a strong case for saying that, when the breeze is up, Carnoustie’s Championship course presents the sternest test of golf in the country.
Set over undulating and supremely firm links land, ditches thread a path through and alongside many holes, out of bounds is an intimidating presence from a number of tees and the perfectly placed bunkers have a magnetic, if unwanted, appeal.
This is a course that examines every element of a player’s game. The layout demands length and accuracy, careful strategy and a delicate touch. As such, any successes around this marvellous course are hugely rewarding and satisfying.
Golf has been played at Carnoustie for hundreds of years, but the Championship course is more recent – Allan Robertson laid out 10 holes in 1850, then Tom Morris made it 18.
James Braid oversaw alterations in the 1920s before local man James Wright completed the finishing touches prior to the Open Championship of 1937. He was responsible for redesigning the final three holes, aiming to “toughen them up”.
If there is any doubt that the course is the most difficult on the Open roster, there is none that the closing three holes serve up its toughest finish.
The 16th is a par 3 of 245 yards played into the prevailing wind. The famous Barry Burn then snakes across the 17th and 18th holes, threatening from the tee on both holes and for the approach to the last.
It was in the base of the burn, short of the final green that Jean Van de Velde’s 1999 Open dream became a farcical nightmare.Carnoustie Golf Links Championship Course Review – Golf Monthly Verdict
The most demanding and dramatic finish on the rota. Exceptional conditioning
This article Carnoustie Golf Links Championship Course Review appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Amazon Prime Day is here! Here's how to find the best golf deals today Amazon Prime Day 2018 Best Golf DealsAmazon Prime Day 2018 is on Monday!
Prime Day is Amazon’s annual deals event just for Prime members. Membership costs £7.99 per month, plus a 30-day free trial is offered. To access the offer visit this Amazon page.
Last year there were Prime Day flash sales on a huge range of golf items such as golf balls, full sets, range finders, tracking devices, training aids, golf bags, apparel, and more – and this year is expected to be even better!
Related: Amazon Prime Day 2017 Best non-golf deals 
What is Amazon Prime Day?
Think of it as another Black Friday. Prime Day is a 36-hour flash sale from Amazon, where, for one day only, consumers can grab a whole host of bargains.
It’s online only and is held to mark Amazon’s birthday. Prime Day started in 2015 on Amazon’s 20th birthday, with this year being its 22nd.
Last year there were over 100,000 items in the Amazon Prime Day sale.
Remember, to take advantage of Amazon Prime Day you need to be an Amazon Prime member, which costs £79 per year or £7.99 per month, however there are ways around it. For instance, you can sign up for a free 30-day trial, but make sure you cancel within the 30 days or you will be charged. Also, Amazon is known for offering a special discounted Prime Day joining rate a few days before Prime Day itself – so keep a lookout!
Continues below

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When is Amazon Prime Day?
Amazon Prime day will start on Monday 16th July and will run until the end on Tuesday 17th July.Related: Amazon Prime Day 2018 Best Non Golf Deal
Do keep a look-out in the days leading up to Prime Day, as last year there were 3,000 items in the sale in the week before Prime Day, with Amazon putting items in the sale in specific categories each day – including golf.Amazon Prime Day 2018 Best Golf Deals
When Monday  July 16th roles around the best golf deals will appear below
 
If you want to grab a golf bargain this summer, make sure you click back to this page on a regular basis to keep ahead of the game. See you soon!
This article Amazon Prime Day 2018 Best Golf Deals appeared first on Golf Monthly.

GM Top 25 coach Clive Tucker looks at five keys that make Rory McIlroy one of the game's best drivers of the ball5 Rory McIlroy Driver Swing Keys You Should Copy
Rory McIlroy is one of the game’s best drivers of the ball.
By breaking his swing down into pivotal positions and calling in Golf Monthly Top 25 Coach Clive Tucker, we’ve highlighted the simple keys any golfer can copy1 Address position
Long, straight drivers of the ball possess certain characteristics, and Rory definitely has them. Before we start highlighting them, I should mention that even though we are looking at ‘positions’, the goal is to incorporate them into the motion of the swing as a whole. So slow swings while watching yourself in the mirror or on video will confirm your feelings are correct. Then you can add speed once you have a feel for the ‘positions’.
Rory has an athletic, poised set-up position, where his balance is centred and he is well aimed and relaxed. Notice also how his spine is tilted away from the target. This allows for an ease of movement into the backswing and enables him to create those crucial launch conditions Keith Sbarbaro talks about.Rory McIlroy’s Launch Monitor Data… Revealed!2 The takeaway
Typically, great driver swings are consistently wide in ‘shape’ back and through. For the technically minded among you, we are talking about the distance from your sternum to the mid-point of your grip in the backswing. This extension in the takeaway is created without any ‘sway’ off the ball – his weight moves towards his right side naturally as the club moves away from the target. The other key point is the sequencing of Rory’s swing. In this position he has approximately 1/3 shoulder turn and 1/3 swing – essentially the club is working in synchronisation with the rotation of the body. Good sequences in the takeaway really help you create both power and accuracy in the downswing.
Rory McIlroy: 5 Secrets To My Game3 Top of backswing
Rory is incredibly solid at the top of his backswing; there are no unnecessary movements, which means he is in complete control. He maintains that wide look – his left arm is long and his spine is still tilted away from the target. A good image here is the two-to-one ratio of shoulder to hip rotation. His hips have rotated enough to allow his torso to fully wind up – this is an incredibly powerful position that creates energy for the downswing.Rory McIlroy’s Gym Routine… Revealed!
4 Delivering the club
Starting with a good set-up, having a well- sequenced takeaway and loading the shoulders and torso at the top is great, but you still need to deliver the club effectively! Rory does this well, as we can see here. His hips, having shifted left during his transition into the downswing, are providing some superb benefits.
They tilt his spine slightly further away from the target, which helps promote a good inside path by lowering the trailing shoulder (this is something to copy if you’re a slicer). It also encourages an upward attack angle, which makes for high-launch, low-spin drives.
Rory McIlroy’s 30-Minute Warm-Up Routine5 Finish position
Not all of us have the flexibility to finish like Rory, but you can have a similar look and hopefully feel. He is incredibly well balanced, and so should you be. A tip here is to try and get the trailing knee, the right one in this case, to finish as near to the left as possible. This brings your balance to the mid-line of your body where it is most comfortable. If the knees stay separated, the balance moves outward and will impede the consistency of the club path. Notice also how his pelvis is fully rotated and facing the target (or even a little left of it), which illustrates that his hips haven’t ‘stalled’ through impact but continued their rotation. This aids shoulder speed and that, in turn, supports the arms, so he can maintain his wide swing for longer. By learning from Rory, you can acquire some sound swing principles that could well deliver outstanding results.
This article 5 Rory McIlroy Driver Swing Keys You Should Copy appeared first on Golf Monthly.

The American President polarises opinion on just about everything and golf is no different. But has his involvement been good or bad for the game?Is Donald Trump Good For Golf?
Like it or not, Donald Trump might just be the most famous golfer on the planet.
Forget about the on-course antics of Justin Thomas and Jordan Spieth, for many people when they think about golf, the American President springs to mind.
Trump acquired his first golf course at West Palm Beach in 1999 and his family’s business now own 17 venues around the world including the UK and Ireland’s highest ranked layout, Turnberry.
The company has a regular Tour venue in Trump Doral and at Bedminster in New Jersey they have hosted the 2017 US Women’s Open.
He may have handed the reigns over to his sons but given this level of involvement in the sport and the controversies that surround him, it seems fair to ask whether Trump is helping or hindering the game we love.Is Donald Trump Good For Golf?
Yes
On the outskirts of Aberdeen, weaving its way through one of Britain’s most dramatic dunescapes is Trump International Golf Links.
Trump International Golf Links Scotland Tour:
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Trump International Scotland Tour
Nestled in and amongst the towering dunes along the Aberdeenshire coast, Trump International opened in 2012 and already ranks 8th in our Top 100 Courses list. Fancy a look around?
Posted by Golf Monthly magazine on Saturday, January 20, 2018
When Trump received pictures of the dunes from a photographer he saw the potential for a spectacular layout and so bought the land.
Controversy followed as he clashed with landowners and the Scottish government but fast-forward to 2018 and that stretch of dunes is celebrating its sixth year as a golf course.
By employing course architect Martin Hawtree, Trump turned a patch of land used by a relatively small group of dog walkers and beach-goers into a must-see sporting destination.
And then of course, there is Turnberry.
The idea of Trump buying and then revamping one of Britain’s most treasured layouts filled many with dread.
They needn’t have worried.
Again his prowess can be seen in his hiring of Martin Ebert.
The new 248 yards par 3, ninth hole of the Ailsa Course at the Trump Turnberry Resort. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images)
By allowing this dramatic coastline to further influence both the aesthetic and the test of the course, it is a commonly held belief that Turnberry has been elevated into something truly awe-inspiring.
Throw in the investment made at Doonbeg in Ireland and it is clear there is a lot for golf fans on this side of the Atlantic to be excited about.
Trump might just have been the only person on the planet with the vision and resources to take on these projects. The golfers who have played them cannot fail to be impressed.
No
Historically, golf has found it hard to shrug off the image of a haven for middle-aged misogynistic white men in bad trousers who revel in the status of being members of private clubs.
Golf was, and possibly still is, a marker of your social status.
For a while it looked as if Tiger Woods would open up the sport to the masses – then he drove into a fire hydrant one fateful November night and things changed.
Nowadays we have a crop of young, athletic superstars all capable of show-stopping sporting achievements.
Under their stewardship the modern game seems in good shape.
Related: Golf Monthly UK&I Top 100 Courses
On the other hand you have the President of the United States.
A man whose comments about women, the disabled and different cultures have shocked and disgusted in equal measure.
To many, this sort of off-the-cuff, ill-informed rhetoric seems to have come straight out of the clubhouse bar.
What’s more, in 2015 Trump told Fortune magazine, “Let golf be elitist. When I say ‘aspire’, that’s a positive word. Let people work hard and aspire to some day be able to play golf. To afford to play it.”
While we all enjoy playing on empty courses at beautifully manicured venues, it is clear this attitude is not in the best interests of the game.
Verdict below

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WATCH: Donald Trump Posts Video Of Golf Swing

WATCH: Donald Trump Posts Video Of Golf Swing
The POTUS posted a video of his golf…

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Golf Courses Donald Trump Owns

Golf Courses Donald Trump Owns
Did you know that Donald Trump owns no…

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Donald Trump Shoots 73 In ‘Windy And Wet’ Conditions

Donald Trump Shoots 73 In ‘Windy And Wet’ Conditions
The POTUS's golf game is clearly still sharp
Verdict
Golf is a sport in transition.
It is competing with other sports and hobbies when spare time is in short supply.
If the game is going to flourish, it needs to look forward towards a modern version of itself and not back towards its elitist past.
However, the truth is that Trump’s influence over the perception of our sport is intangible.
His politics and his rhetoric are divisive but are they stopping people from engaging with golf?
Maybe, maybe not.
What is for sure is that the Trump Organization owns, invests in and consistently improves an expanding group of venues.
His vision for golf courses and ability to realise his lofty ambitions are enriching the game we love.
On balance, I can’t help but feel golf’s landscape would be poorer without him.As always, let us know your thoughts on the Golf Monthly social channels
This article Is Donald Trump Good For Golf? appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Four-time major winner Rory McIlroy shares five key secrets to his gameRory McIlroy 5 Secrets To My GameTechnique
You need constance in your golf swing. For me it’s set up, it’s grip, it’s posture, and it’s the fundamentals. Because if you can keep those things the same and start from a really good position, then it just makes everything else just that little bit more simple. I mean biomechanically we’re talking about K Vest and all that sort of stuff. The first time I was tested by it mechanically, I realised that my maximum velocity of my golf swing was about 18 inches before I’d even hit the ball. So I was actually slowing down and that was because of a few things. Physically, I wasn’t strong enough on my left side. My left quad wasn’t supporting the speed that was going into the ball. So, I needed to strengthen that in order to hold that speed that I could produce all the way through impact. It’s just stuff like that that maybe helped me hit the ball a little bit longer and even a little bit straighter as well just because of the stability I have. But I just learnt. Learn what’s best for you. If people look at me they may think ‘oh he sets it a little too steep or my right elbow isn’t tucked in enough at the top of the backswing. You know there are loads of things that I do differently to some other people, but I’ve told people that I have found out what works for me. I think everyone in golf, when they practise and when they work on things they have to realise what works for them. What moves I make in my swing or the little swing thoughts that I have, they trigger something in me to enable me to hit the ball where I want it to go. But those swing thoughts or feelings that I have might not necessarily work for someone else. It works for me and I’ve created good feelings from it and I’ve had good results with it. Golf is such an individual game, you look at two swings and no two swings are the same. Be as individual as you possibly can. Don’t try and copy anyone else, just learn what works for you and go from there.Rory McIlroy’s Gym Routine… Revealed!Practice
There definitely has to be a blend. There has to be technical parts of your practice where you’re working on your swing and working on getting into different positions that will allow you to hit the ball better, hit then ball more consistent but then you have to get away from that part of it and play games and put yourself under pressure in practice. The more you simulate what it’s going to be like on the golf course on the range, the better you’re going to perform out there. Yes of course there has to be times where you might be working on your drills and you’re working on your set-up with alignment, you’re practising taking the club half way back, whatever it may be. But you have to get out of that and do enough reps of that so it beds in itself without much thought. Then you have to just need to hit shots. Hit shots that you’ll need on the golf course. Whether you pretend there’s a pin in the middle of the range, ‘okay this is a back right pin and I can’t miss it right’, you know all that sort of stuff. Just put yourself under pressure and I really enjoy playing games like that on the range because that’s what makes you better. That’s what makes you when you’re under pressure hitting a shot with a one shot lead heading into the last hole, those sessions on the range are what will make you produce those shots which will hopefully make you win a golf tournament.Rory McIlroy What’s In The Bag?
Finish position
I think if you’ve got a good finish position, it means that everything that’s comes before it has been in sync and in balance and it’s worked pretty well. But yeah, that was always a thing I got from my Dad actually. He always said to me ‘Hold your finish’, so that’s why I always have. With my finish and my balance from a very early age my Dad has just drilled that into me saying ‘hold your finish, hold your finish’. But yeah I think if you’re in a nice balanced position on your follow through, it means everything – well at least from halfway back starting down through impact has gone well. From a couple of feet before the ball and a couple of feet after the ball that’s where you need to be good!Rory McIlroy 30-Minute Warm-Up RoutineMental game
For me, the closest I’ve felt to that, the closest I’ve felt to feeling not invincible but ‘nothing can get to me, I’m on a mission here this is my goal and I’m not going to stop until I get to that goal’ was on the back nine at Valhalla in 2014 when I won the USPGA. I got into a zone where every flag that I looked at, every shot, every putt that I hit, I just kept hitting great shot after great shot. I guess there was no doubt in my mind that I was going to hit a bad shot. I just saw the pin, I selected the club I was going to hit and I knew the swing I needed to put on it. I feel like I’ve been in the zone a few times but that was one time where I really needed to be in it. You know it happens in the first round of a tournament and you shoot a really great score but there’s still three rounds left where as this was nine holes to go in one of the the biggest tournament in the world. You obviously try to stay in it as long as you can. You learn I think how important the mental side of the game is and what having the proper mindset can do for you. I say if people went out there with the right mindset and thought about the right things and have confidence in themselves, didn’t have any doubt about what shot they were going to hit ‘oh I don’t want to hit left into these trees or hit it right into the water’ and if they blocked all that out, it’s amazing the difference that can make. Of course it’s hard, I know it’s hard, I have doubts, everyone has doubts, the best players in the world still doubt themselves when over a golf shot. But if you free will and let it go as much you can, that’s when the results will start to show.Rory McIlroy How I PractiseStrategy
Nowadays I’m a little more aggressive when I need to be but I’m conservative and experienced enough to know four days of golf is a long time, a lot can happen in 72 holes. But I’m probably a little more conservative nowadays than a used to be. I mean I’m still more aggressive than the majority of players so I’d give myself probably a seven and a half or eight out of ten! I am aggressive and take on some shots that I probably shouldn’t. Sometimes it works out, sometimes it doesn’t. It’s a nice message to put out to young people ‘believe in yourself, be positive and to back yourself.
This article Rory McIlroy 5 Secrets To My Game appeared first on Golf Monthly.

Take a look at what clubs Andrew 'Beef' Johnston puts into his bag.See what Andrew Johnston puts in his bag (Getty Images)Andrew Johnston What’s In The Bag?
One of the most popular players on tour, Andrew Johnston is yet to qualify for the Open Championship at Carnoustie. Regardless, take a look at what clubs he uses in this piece.
A Titleist and FootJoy ambassador, Johnston’s driver is a 917 D2 model with 9.5 degrees of loft. He averages roughly 297 yards off the tee putting him just outside the top 100 in driving distance on the European Tour.
Johnston using his 917 D2 Titles Driver (Getty Images)
Next up is his 917F3 fairway wood that he often uses from the tee to make sure he hits the fairway.
Johnston is one of many Tour professionals who choose to put a hybrid in the bag. His model is the 818H2 hybrid that gives more forgiveness off the tee and is easier to hit out of the rough. Johnston used to play a Titleist 718 T-MB 2 and 3 iron.
Moving onto the irons, Beef puts the 718 MB irons into play. Currently he is 24th in greens in regulation on the European Tour with a percentage of 72.5 greens hit. He is also in the top 10 for strokes gained tee to green.
Johnston uses Titleist 718 MB irons (Getty Images)

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Justin Thomas What’s In The Bag?

Justin Thomas What’s In The Bag?
Take a look inside the golf bag of…

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Rickie Fowler What’s In The Bag?

Rickie Fowler What’s In The Bag?
Take a look at the equipment used by…

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Hideki Matsuyama What’s In The Bag?

Hideki Matsuyama What’s In The Bag?
Take a look at the equipment used by…
Johnston has a scrambling percentage of 61% on the European Tour and the weapons he uses to do so around the greens are Titleist Spin Milled SM7 wedges.
Johnston uses SM7 wedges (Getty Images)
Finally, Johnston has been struggling with hit putting of late and is currently ranked 240th in strokes gained putting on the European Tour. Right now he uses a Scotty Cameron Newport 2 Tour.
Putting with his Scotty Cameron (Getty Images)Andrew Johnston What’s In The Bag?
Driver: Titleist 917 D2 Driver – 9.5 degrees
Woods: Titleist 917 F3 Fairway wood – 13 degrees.
Hybrid: Titleist 818H2 Hybrid – 18 degrees
Irons: Titleist 718 MB irons (3-9)
Wedges: Titleist Spin Milled SM7 wedges – 46, 50, 58 degrees
Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport 2 Tour
Ball: Titleist Pro V1
Apparel: FootJoy
Shoes: FootJoyDon’t forget to follow Golf Monthly on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. 
This article Andrew Johnston What’s In The Bag? appeared first on Golf Monthly.

We take a look at the gear Francesco Molinari used for his two 2018 wins and what he will use at The Open. See what Francesco Molinari used for his two wins this year (Getty Images) Francesco Molinari What’s In The Bag?
Here we take a look at the clubs Francesco Molinari has used to win twice this year and what he will use at Open Championship.
Historically, the Italian has played Nike clubs but has slowly started switching to TaylorMade clubs in the past couple of seasons.
One of the strongest parts of his game, Molinari uses a TaylorMade M4 driver with 8.5 degrees of loft to help him get a few more yards. He still averages just over 300 yards so is not the shortest player on tour, but clearly he has sought to get as much length as possible.BUY NOW: TaylorMade M4 Driver from £349 at American Golf
Molinari seen using the TaylorMade M4 driver (Rob Carr/Getty Images)
The younger Molinari brother uses both M3 and M4 fairway woods at the moment. The M3 acts as his strong 3-wood with 13 degrees of loft, whereas the M4 acts as his 5-wood at 18 degrees.
BUY NOW: TaylorMade M3 wood from £249 at American Golf
Molinari using his TaylorMade M3 wood (Getty Images)
Currently ranked 28th on the PGA Tour for greens in regulation, Molinari is incredibly consistent at finding the dance floor with his irons. Right now he uses TaylorMade’s P750 irons ranging from the 5-iron to the pitching wedge. He also uses a P790 4-iron.BUY NOW: TaylorMade P790 irons from £929 at American Golf
The Italian uses P750 irons and a P790 4-iron by TaylorMade (Getty Images)

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Tiger Woods What’s In The Bag?

Tiger Woods What’s In The Bag?
Check out the equipment used by Tiger Woods

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Dustin Johnson What’s In The Bag?

Dustin Johnson What’s In The Bag?
We take a look at the equipment used…

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Rory McIlroy What’s In The Bag?

Rory McIlroy What’s In The Bag?
See the clubs Rory McIlroy currently has in…
Like most players on tour these days, Francesco has three wedges. The first two are TaylorMade Milled Grind wedges with 50 and 56 degrees of loft.
Finally he has a TaylorMade Hi-Toe Wedge at 60 degrees.BUY NOW: TaylorMade Milled Grind Wedges from £129 at American Golf
Molinari uses TaylorMade wedges at the moment (Getty Images)
Molinari signed with Bettinardi in 2018 and since switching to the DASS BBZero, he has won at Wentworth and at Quicken Loans. He also uses a Titliest ProV1x ball despite having TaylorMade throughout the bag.

@F_Molinari’s putter that won the @BMWchamps at Wentworh, a DASS BBZero with an appropriate Italian paint scheme #TeamBettinardi pic.twitter.com/aOUmsPVjXa
— Bettinardi Golf (@BettinardiGolf) May 27, 2018
Francesco Molinari What’s In The Bag?Driver: TaylorMade M4 8.5* (Mitsubishi Tensei White 60x)3-wood: TaylorMade M3 13˚5-wood: TaylorMade M4 18˚
Irons: TaylorMade P790 4, P750 5-PW (Dynamic Gold X100)Wedges: TaylorMade Milled Grind 50˚, 56˚, Hi-Toe 60˚Putter: Bettinardi Dass BBZeroBall: Titleist Pro V1xApparel: NikeShoes: NikeBUY NOW: Nike Apparel from £20 at American Golf
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This article Francesco Molinari What’s In The Bag? appeared first on Golf Monthly.