Your Interests. Your Schedule.

Find and explore interests through activities, knowledge, and local resources.

What is TheGoSite?

Get Started

Join TheGoSite Community FREE
Simple 30-second signup

Create Account

Vincenzo Nibali joined his Bahrain-Merida teammates at a training camp in Catalunya on Tuesday to prepare for the 2019 season but confirmed that he is already thinking about 2020 and his personal future, which could be at Bahrain-Merida, Trek-Segafredo or even elsewhere. Nibali admitted to Cyclingnews that Team Sky team manager Dave Brailsford had contacted his agent Johnny Carera after he said before last year's Il Lombardia that he'd be flattered to receive an offer from the British team. Team Sky's future is now in doubt after Sky decided to leave the sport but Trek-Segafredo have stepped up and confirmed they want to sign Nibali, with the Italian coffee brand offering Nibali a apparently tempting post-career ambassador role. Nibali, his agent and lawyer held talks with both Bahrain-Merida and Trek-Segafredo teams last week and both will soon submit formal offers that include a two-year deal, a Grand Tour winners salary and the hiring of his personal staff and his brother Antonio.ADVERTISEMENT "I'm still here…." Nibali told Cyclingnews with a smile while sitting under a Bahrain-Merida backdrop and in the team's red and blue colours but very much his own man. "We'll see what happens in the future. They're important negotiations and important projects on offer. "I think it's normal that when a contract ends, you listen to the offers. Listening is easy to do. It can also be motivating depending on the projects that are on offer." First the Giro d'Italia, then the Tour de France
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

At first, CCC Team's Patrick Bevin wasn't given much credit for having won stage 2 of the 2019 Tour Down Under in Angaston on Wednesday. Almost everyone had assumed that the bright-orange-clad rider who had got the better of Lotto Soudal's Caleb Ewan and three-time world champion Peter Sagan (Bora-Hansgrohe) in the race for the line was CCC's designated sprinter Jakub Mareczko. It took a couple of minutes for the news to filter through: Bevin, who had taken enough bonus seconds while in a breakaway on Tuesday's opening stage to put himself into third overall going into the second day, was the day's winner, and the 10-second stage winner's bonus had also been enough to give him the race lead, deposing overnight leader Elia Viviani (Deceuninck-QuickStep), who could only finish seventh. "The team was riding for Mareczko," Bevin confirmed, "but I had a free role. They were going to try to lead him out, but obviously with me chasing the GC here, I had to stay up there and not lose time.ADVERTISEMENT "We knew it was a tough finish," he said. "We'd 'reconned' it, so it was a case of, 'If it happens, it happens,' but the finish was really tough. It was on for the last five kilometres - full gas - because otherwise the day had been quite easy, so it just became about looking after what I could do for me, and I happened to pick up a teammate [Fran Ventoso] after it got separated [due to the crash] and that was a big help to deliver me in the last kilometre." Bevin explained that it wasn't really until with two kilometres to go that he thought he might have a chance. "The road kind of dragged up there, and I got myself into a really good position, on the shoulder of the road, out of the wind," he said. "Just as the crash happened, I was starting to move up and come around, and then the Astana rider, Luis Leon Sanchez, went off the front, and so I thought I'd try to pick him up and use him as a springboard, as I knew that in a straight sprint I wasn't going to be able to beat those other guys.
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

Wout Poels (Team Sky) might be making his debut at the Tour Down Under this year, but the Dutch climber is intent on leaving an impression on the race as he targets the GC. The race is likely to be decided on the climb of Willunga Hill, which this year acts as the finale to the six-day race. Richie Porte - now of Trek-Segafredo - has won on Willunga five times, and although the Australian has only gone onto win the overall once, he started this year's race as the outright favourite. "I'm going to try for GC," Poels told Cyclingnews from the race.ADVERTISEMENT "We have done recon and it's going to be hard with the weather. I think the race suits me well. I've started the season well sometimes but in other years it takes me some time but we'll see. It would be nice to have a new winner on Willunga but we'll try." Team Sky have come to the Tour Down Under with a mix of Classics, Grand Tour and one-day specialists. They have a squad that will take on a block of racing that also includes the Cadel Evans race and the Herald Sun Tour, with Poels expected to lead the line throughout the block of racing. Poels is well versed in having opportunities in week-long and one-day races. However, since his move to Team Sky five years ago he has been utilized as a super domestique in Grand Tours. There was a top-ten in the 2017 Vuelta a España but that came after Chris Froome won the overall. The 31-year-old is out of contract at the end of this season - regardless of the future of the team's sponsor hunt - but he is comfortable with his place at the British team.
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

The EF Education First Pro Cycling Team made the headlines last weekend as the final team to launch their eye-catching 2019 Rapha team kit. Accompanying the conspicuous pink fade design in the press release were claims from the team about how they will 'disrupt' the peloton in 2019. However, after Tuesday's WorldTour opener the team were out of the limelight — Dan McLay was the team's best placed finisher in 13th while teammates took the final three positions on the results sheet. The hope of disrupting the peloton will have to wait a little bit longer, but with more sprint stages and Michael Woods capable of a GC challenge there are more opportunities in the coming days. The sprint into Port Adelaide was a chaotic affair and the cross headwind, combined with a number of new look sprinter's teams still looking to gel, put an impotence into the idea of a dominant lead-out train from any squad.ADVERTISEMENT Speaking to Cyclingnews after the stage, McLay described the day: "With a bit of a head wind and the break already brought back, you're kind of in the situation where you're just waiting until someone starts it. "It was pretty hectic but the boys did a good job. We were there perhaps a bit too soon, I should've backed off and got in a wheel a bit sooner as I was pushing some wind in the corners there at the end. "It was pretty chaotic, a few guys bouncing off the barriers I think they were maybe a bit too excited. I think I had to get out on the right, my normal thing is to wait way too long and duck up on the right-hand side so I was trying to get out but lost too much speed to get out. In hindsight I should've stayed on the left with Viviani but hindsight's great and he's got the momentum at the moment and the instinct, but we'll give it another crack. "
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

Nairo Quintana (Movistar) has downplayed the significance of his head-to-head meeting with Chris Froome (Team Sky) at next month's Tour Colombia. In a press conference in Bogota on Monday, Quintana pointed out that both riders would be lining out in the Colombian race with the principal aim of accumulating racing kilometres as they build towards the Tour de France. "It's very early to start thinking about different strategies," Quintana said, according to Marca. "You have to see how we're each going and how each team is working, but in truth he is like any other rival. He will surely come with the same objectives as me: to start [his season] and do the kilometres to get to the Tour de France in very good shape." Quintana endured a disappointing 2018 season, placing 10th overall at the Tour and 8th at the Vuelta a España. Despite that setback, the 28-year-old will target the Tour once again this season. He will be accompanied in Movistar's Tour line-up by Mikel Landa, while world champion Alejandro Valverde is set to ride the Giro d'Italia.ADVERTISEMENT Now in its second edition – the inaugural event was labelled Colombia Paz y Oro – the Tour Colombia remains a six-day event, but has shifted to a slightly later date. The race gets underway with a team time trial in Medellin on February 12 and concludes with a finish on Alto de Palmas on February 17. This year's Tour Colombia will take place in the Antioquia department, while Quintana's home department of Boyaca is pencilled in to host the 2020 edition of the race. Quintana placed third overall in last year's Colombia Paz y Oro, which was won by fellow countryman Egan Bernal (Team Sky). Bernal is due to return to the race this year alongside Froome, Tao Geoghegan Hart and new signing Ivan Sosa. Quintana is set to be joined in the Movistar line-up by Carlos Betancur, Winner Anacona, Marc Soler and Richard Carapaz. Valverde confirmed via a video message on Monday that he will not race in Colombia this season, though he pledged to line out at the event in 2020.
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

The UCI has confirmed that its proposed ban of the painkiller tramadol will come into effect on March 1. The governing body also detailed the punishments to be handed out if a rider tests positive, with penalties ranging from CHF 5,000 for a first offence to a nine-month suspension for a third offence. In June of last year, the UCI announced its intention to ban tramadol from 2019, but later said that the measure was not likely to come into force until March. Tramadol has been a hot topic in cycling for the best part of a decade and many have called for it to be put on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) banned list. It is currently on the monitored list – where it has been since 2012 – and WADA has toyed with the idea of banning it but has not yet taken that step. WADA has previously stated it is happy with the UCI banning tramadol independently of the WADA code. ADVERTISEMENT A study of WADA's 2017 Monitoring Report data last year found that between 71 and 82 per cent of positive results for the painkiller came from cycling. In addition, as many as four per cent of all doping controls from within the sport showed traces of the substance. Tramadol is an opioid pain medication and has side-effects that have the potential to cause crashes during races. It is for safety, then, that the UCI has chosen to ban it from the peloton, rather than for any performance-enhancing qualities it might have. "The use of tramadol can have two types of side-effect: nausea, drowsiness and loss of concentration (increasing the risk of race crashes), and gradual dependence on the substance with a risk of developing an addiction," read a statement from the UCI. "Tramadol is available on prescription but is also freely available on the internet, which increases the risk of uncontrolled self-medication.
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

After his podium finish at the Vuelta a España last year – in only his second Grand Tour – expectations surrounding Enric Mas are as high as ever. The rider dubbed 'the next Alberto Contador' heads to the Tour de France for the first time in 2019 and his own hopes are just as high, as he insisted he'll be there to try to win it. Mas discussed his Tour debut last week, sitting down in front of the media at Deceunicnk-Quick-Step's team presentation in Calpe. Moments beforehand, Quick-Step manager Patrick Lefevere had made reference to the 'next Contador' moniker – imparted by the seven-time Grand Tour winner himself – and how it was a 'poisoned chalice'. Mas, who has in the past insisted he'd rather be seen as the first Enric Mas rather than the new Alberto Contador, seems to have successfully deflected the pressure, having only turned 24 last week. ADVERTISEMENT "I now just take it as a joke," Mas said of being compared to Contador. "The pressure I put on myself is the biggest of all." As well as having ridden for the Fundación Contador development team, the speed of Mas' rise does draw comparisons with Contador, who won the Tour de France in 2007 on what was only his second Grand Tour appearance. Mas turned pro with Quick-Step in 2017, riding the Vuelta in his first season before going back to claim a memorable third place overall last September. While Bob Jungels, the team's other Grand Tour general classification leader, will return to the Giro d'Italia in 2019, Mas feels ready to lead the line at the Tour de France. Team support
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com

It may be a team with a new sponsor rather than a new team, per se, but CCC Team's first outing in their new guise – the squad was formerly known as BMC Racing – was a successful one on stage 1 of the Tour Down Under on Tuesday, with Paddy Bevin spending the day in the break and picking up a number of bonus seconds before Jakub Mareczko sprinted to third place on the stage. Bevin escaped with Team Sunweb's Michael Storer, Jason Lea (UniSA-Australia) and Artyom Zakharov (Astana), and while Zakharov later dropped back to the relative safety of the peloton on what was a scorching hot day on the stage between North Adelaide and Port Adelaide, the trio battled on until eventually being caught. Bevin's efforts, however, netted the New Zealander five bonus seconds, putting him into third place on the general classification by the end of the day. "It was definitely our intention to go out there after the bonus seconds," Bevin explained. "We talked about it yesterday, and if they were going to let a group roll away and you could kind of sneak off the front and take some sneaky time in a race that's often decided on count back or bonus seconds, then why not take the opportunity?"ADVERTISEMENT In making his move, Bevin made his general classification ambitions clear. "Absolutely," he said. "That was a GC play today, and although it's a bit of a gamble when it's this hot, it's this hot for everyone. There are not too many times in this race where you can say, 'Hey, there are two intermediate sprints out there with bonus seconds on offer just for being out there," so we went out and took them. It means we start the next five stages with a head start." If there's a downside to burning some of your matches so early, it's that Bevin could struggle in the coming days. The 27-year-old, however, thinks it's a risk worth taking. Mareczko in the mix
You can read more at Cyclingnews.com